Sum Ting Wong VII

Parts I here, II here, III here, IV here, V here, and VI here

ALPHABETICAL LISTING (S-Z)

Samouraïs (2002): A muscular Japanese male demon rapes a Japanese female in the nether-world. Said female finds her romantic partner in a European male.

Saving Silverman (2001): “… while trying to flee from Wayne and J.D., Judith frantically bangs on a person’s door. An older Japanese man then sees her, comments about her being horny and prepares to let her in (but ends up falling down his steps).” (screenit.com)

Sayonara (1957): “… Ricardo Montalban played “a Kabuki performer, a ‘male actress,’ able to play both female and male roles” in Sayonara. The female lead, Eileen takes an interest in him. Although they clearly admire each other, they are also distant. They have no intimate contact and their conversation is more polite than passionate.” (Kashiwabara 1986). [Note: The Spaniard Montalban plays the no surname Japanese ‘Nakamura.’]

The Secrets of Wu Sin (1932): “Nona heads down to Chinatown where she meets her friend Mei Lin who runs a little concession shop there. Mei Lin proceeds to fill in the rest of the story: She loves one Charlie San (Richard Loo), but is not allowed to marry him. Instead, her uncle Wu Sin (Tetsu Komai) is going to marry her off to someone else, and is threatening Charlie to keep away — or else.” (Nepstad 2004).

La Senorita Lee (1995): “In this dramatic short, Jeanie Lee, a young Korean-American woman, pregnant by her recently departed Mexican boyfriend and about to be married to a dull, parentally-approved Korean doctor, is torn between conflicting cultural values. Her untimely pregnancy awakens powerful desires and memories in Jeanie, forcing her to choose between traditional family values and personal freedom.” (MRC 1996).

The Seventh Floor (1994): “In an unusual portrayal of a romantic relationship between a white woman and an Asian American man, Brooke Shields falls for Masaya Kato. Kato is not what he seems, however, and quickly turns into a psychotic stalker who places Shields in peril. Like Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Cheat” made 80 years earlier, “The Seventh Floor” suggests that Americanized Asian men are even more dangerous than unassimilated ones because they can deceive people into trusting them.” [ModelMinority Forum].

Shanghai Baby (2007): Depressed, drug-addicted, impotent Chinese male Tiantian is initially loved by Chinese female Coco. She then turns to sexing a married German named Mark, continuing even after meeting his wife and child. Tiantian dies in a drug overdose but the German goes back to his wife and child. “Shanghai Baby was banned in China as being decadent and copies were publicly burned.” [Wikipedia]. The author, Chinese female Zhou Weihui states that: “One is for love, the other is for lust” [Smith 2000].

The Shield (2002): In episode ‘Cherrypoppers,’ four East Asian males are sexing and pimping a 12 year old East Asian female.

Showdown in Little Tokyo (1991): Yakuza badguy Yoshida (Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa) kills a blond European female (by samurai-styled beheading) and videotapes it. The girl’s friend Minako (Tia Carrere) sees the video and is raped by Yoshida. Yoshida killed Detective Kenner’s (Dolph Lungren) parents in Japan. Minako is rescued from Yoshida and before she can ceremonially disembowel herself, she is saved by Lungren who has sex with her.

The Silent Force (2001): Natalie Woo (Karen Kim) is an undercover agent who sexes Chinese thug Jimmy Thai (Roger Yuan) so as to infiltrate a Chinese gang. At the end of the movie however, Natalie is romantic with European DEA agent Frank Stevens (Loren Avedon) [ModelMinority Forum].

Sixteen Candles (1984): Sex-crazed East Asian male named Long Duk Dong desires romance with a European female. She scorns his advances with his attempts at romantic masculinization shown as comically effeminate.

Street Kings (2008): Four Korean baddies imprisoned and raped two 14-year old East Asian female twins. Keanu Reeves hunts them down and unceremoniously kills them enhanced by cinematic blood-splattery. Two of the dead thugs are credited as “toilet man” and “towel man.”

The Thief of Bagdad (1924): In yellow peril fashion, a Mongol prince wants to conquer Bagdad using the ruse of seeking marriage with the caliph’s daughter. She does not like the Mongol, Persian or Indian prince suitors, but chooses fellow Arab Ahmed (played by  Hebrew/European actor Douglas Fairbanks). Ahmed foils the Mongol’s plot and saves the princess.

A Thousand Pieces of Gold (1991): In 1880’s China, young Lalu (whoa, what kind of name is that) is sold into marriage by her impoverished father. Rather than becoming a bride, Lalu ends up in an Idaho gold-mining town, the property of a saloon owner (your elderly and horny Asian man) who renames her China Polly and plans to sell her as entertainment for the locals. Then, she got bought and thus rescued by a great white cowboy. Hurray! [ModelMinority Forum].

Year of the Dragon (1985): Three young Chinese males rape Tracy Tzu. Even after this ordeal, she readily sexes a racist Irish male.

The Unit (2006): In episode ‘Manhunt,’ East Asian male Raul Esemien (Ryun Yu) and his US European girlfriend Justine Cole (Jana Camp) are terrorists. Justine is shot and killed.

Vanishing Son (1995): East Asian criminal called “White Powder Moss” has “a penchant for blondes.” (Kashiwabara 1996).

SOURCES:

Kashiwabara, A. 1996. Vanishing Son: The Appearance, Disappearance, and Assimilation of the Asian-American Man in American Mainstream Media. Senior Honors Thesis in Political Science, UC Berkeley. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/Amydoc.html [accessed: 2013-08-25].

MRC. 1996. “The Movies, Race, and Ethnicity: Asians/Asian Americans.” Moffitt Library, UC Berkeley. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/imagesasians.html [accessed: 2013-08-25].

Nepstad, Peter. 2004. “Secrets of Wu Sin, The.” The Illuminated Lantern. http://www.illuminatedlantern.com/cinema/review/archives/secrets_of_wu_sin_the.php [accessed: 2013-08-25].

Smith, Craig. 2000. ‘Shanghai Journal; Sex, Lust, Drugs: Her Novel’s Too Much for China.’ The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2000/05/11/world/shanghai-journal-sex-lust-drugs-her-novel-s-too-much-for-china.html?pagewanted=all [accessed: 2013-08-31].

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2 thoughts on “Sum Ting Wong VII

  1. Pingback: List of Anti-Asian Male TV Shows – Anti-Asian Male Media Database

  2. Pingback: List of Anti-Asian Male Movies (Updated Daily) – AMDb: The Anti-Asian-Male Movie Database

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